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General Discussion / Re: Erick PLEASE
« Last post by Erick on December 15, 2017, 08:50:14 PM »
JoJo et al:

Just performed some more edits for better nuanced explanation.
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General Discussion / Bruce is Busy, Call Someone Else
« Last post by Nemo on December 15, 2017, 05:56:00 PM »
For this one.

Nemo


Quote

Everything about this space object appears odd. Is it a Ďvisitorí from nearby star Vega?


ITíS more than extraterrestrial. Itís extrasolar. A strange object has been spotted - is it our first interstellar visitor?
Jamie Seidel
News Corp Australia NetworkOctober 26, 20178:49am

How advanced would aliens need to be to contact Earth?

IT was first seen just a month ago.

A tiny blip of light was seen to be moving through the sky by the PanSTARRS1 telescope in Hawaii.

The number-crunching which followed was automatic.

The results were unusual.

This object is in an odd position. Itís moving very fast.

And itís in what appears to be a somewhat extreme orbit.

Extreme enough not to actually be an orbit, in fact.

    That's something you don't see from @MinorPlanetCtr every day. Cautious until orbit is better. Observable by >0.4 m https://t.co/aBGJ7geEa3 pic.twitter.com/UgdvnQcsqx
    ó Michele Bannister (@astrokiwi) October 25, 2017

Observations published by the by the International Astronomical Unionís Minor Planet Center (MPC) suggest it could have come from deep space.

Specifically, it could be a comet that has escaped another star.

ďIf further observations confirm the unusual nature of this orbit, this object may be the first clear case of an interstellar comet,Ē the MPC declares.

WHAT IS C/2017 U1?

The PanSTARRS telescope spotted the object only after it was flung back out towards the stars by our Sun.

Itís not likely to ever return.

It flashed past Earth at 24 million kilometres on October 14.

Many eyes watched it closely, keen to determine exactly what it was.

Their curiosity was piqued by where it had come from.

Most objects orbiting our Sun do so along a common plane: the planets, dwarf planets and asteroids mostly swing around in roughly the same way.

    Here's what the nominal orbit looks like.https://t.co/2wbnzQrGI0 pic.twitter.com/zfqhacubhG
    ó Tony Dunn (@tony873004) October 25, 2017

This one appears to have come down on the plane from 122 degrees, from the direction of the star Vega, in the constellation Lyra. And its path did not indicate the curved ellipse typical of clockwork-like returning comets.

Best guesstimates make it a comet of about 160m diameter, with a surface reflectivity (albedo) of about 10 per cent.

A WANDERER

The object has just been through a close call (in Solar System terms): it came within 38 million km of our star before its momentum and the Sunís gravity hurled it back outward.

Normally such a close pass would be fatal. But C/2017U1 was travelling too fast for the Sunís heat to consume it.

It was moving at 26km per second when first observed.

Astronomers are now attempting to refine their observations and data to pinpoint exactly where it came from. If it truly is of interstellar origin, the next task is to find which star it is likely to have come from.

At the moment, it appears to have been somewhere in the direction of the star Vega.

Itís also likely to have been wandering, alone, in deep space for a very, very long time.

Vega is a relatively close neighbour of our Sun at 25 light years distance. At the speed itís travelling, it would take about half a million years to cross the interstellar divide.

   It didn't come from Vega.

    At 26 km/s, it would have taken #A2017U1 nearly 300,000 years to travel from Vega to the Sun.

    But where was Vega then? Nowhere near the asteroid.

    Here is the simulation that created the animation.https://t.co/m2uZHpbTyj pic.twitter.com/jNvpdJGt4L
    ó Tony Dunn (@tony873004) October 28, 2017
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General Discussion / Call Bruce Willis
« Last post by Nemo on December 15, 2017, 05:53:18 PM »
Here comes the asteroid!

Nemo


http://www.foxnews.com/science/2017/12/15/massive-3-mile-wide-potentially-hazardous-asteroid-will-zoom-past-earth-tomorrow.html


Quote
Massive, 3-mile-wide 'potentially hazardous asteroid' will zoom past Earth tomorrow
By Chris Ciaccia | Fox News

An enormous, 3-mile-wide "potentially hazardous asteroid" is hurtling toward Earth and is slated to zoom past the planet tomorrow, but scientists say there is no need to worry.

Known as 3200 Phaethon, the space rock orbits the Sun and is expected to come the closest it has come to Earth since 1974, 6.4-million miles away, according to a statement from NASA.

There is no chance the asteroid will hit Earth and won't come this close again until 2093. Despite that, it has been classified as a "Potentially Hazardous Asteroid" by the Minor Planet Center, NASA added in the statement.

NASA said that the asteroid is "potentially detectable at Goldstone [a NASA communications complex] for about three weeks and tracks are scheduled on ten days between Dec. 11-21." The government agency said that it will also remain visible at the Arecibo observatory, located in Puerto Rico, between Dec. 15 and Dec. 19.

3200 Phaethon is thought to cause the annual Geminid meteor shower, which this year reached its peak this past Thursday.

Astronomers almost unanimously agree that no asteroid, particularly those of the near-Earth variety, will hit our planet in our lifetime. However, if one of this size were to hit us, it could cause some serious damage.

Boston University astronomy professor Michael Mendillo told Time that 3200 Phaethon "would be this kind of object that would cause a catastrophic collision, should there be one,Ē before adding that it is highly unlikely.

Scientists have said they "can't rule out" a potential collision with the asteroid 99942 Apophis, but that is not slated to come very close to Earth until 2029.

This is not the first time in recent memory an asteroid of this size whizzes past Earth.

In August, a 2.7-mile wide asteroid dubbed Florence passed by Earth at a safe distance of 4.4 million miles, roughly 18 times the distance between Earth and the moon.

In October, 2012 TC4, a space rock estimated to measure between 50 and 100 feet, passed safely past Earth by 26,000 miles and was used to test Earthís international warning network.

Plans to save humanity

If an asteroid were to ever threaten the Earth, NASA has a plan to fight off "possible life-threatening" asteroids.

In June, the agency unveiled a video using 3-D modeling techniques and one of its supercomputers in an effort to produce simulations on a variety of asteroid impact scenarios. This allows first responders and other agencies to identify threats and make better decisions should an event occur in the future.

The work is being done by experts on the Asteroid Threat Assessment Project at the NASA Advanced Supercomputing facility at Ames Research Center in Californiaís Silicon Valley. The efforts are in conjunction with NASAís Planetary Defense Coordination Office.

The research has been shared with a number of different parties, including university scientists, national research labs and different government agencies.

The work follows an asteroid collision in 2013 in the Russian city of Chelyabinsk. The blast from the asteroid injured more than 1,200 people and damaged building 58 miles away.

Separately, in 2016, NASA opened a new office to track asteroids and comets that come too close to Earth, known as the Planetary Defense Coordination Office (PDCO).

The PDCO formalizes the agencyís existing program for detecting and tracking Near-Earth Objects, known as NEOs.

NASA has been studying NEOs since the 1970s. According to the PDCO, NASA-funded survey projects have found more than 95 percent of the known catalog of over 15,000 NEOs.
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Security & Survival / Re: Big Ammo review of commercial Ammo for commercial AR15s
« Last post by Erick on December 15, 2017, 03:39:19 PM »
Have shot more of the following rounds listed here since the original write up was written:

Wolf MC 62gr (both FMJ and HP)
Brown Bear 62GR HP
Colt 62GR HP and FMJ
Wolf Gold 55gr
some PPU 55gr
Golden Tiger 56gr (not typo) . been shooting this the most since I have significant stocks of this type.

All in all further firing did not change any posted results but reaffirmed them.  :dance:
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General Discussion / Re: Erick PLEASE
« Last post by Erick on December 15, 2017, 01:34:18 PM »
Thanks to both of you for information that I couldn't find anywhere else.

@pkveazey

Quote
devices that operate above 100 Mhz, would be much less affected
Am I correct in assuming that some if not most automobiles will not be affected?

part 3 :  (missed this before)

You are correct. Contrary to Prepper lore there is no reason to expect car ECU's to get "fried" and many reasons to expect they wont get "fried".
ECUs  are shielded twice, once by their own sleeve-shield which works against the alternators Electromagnetic Interference ( EMI, the tiny brother of EMP) and once by the body of the vehicle.. also tests with lighting, which is much stronger than any EMP have shown cars/trucks almost never affected and EMP tests on vehicles done by Defense Threat Reduction Agency have shown no or no significant effects on modern vehicle ECUs either.

This does not mean that accidents caused by many panicked people fleeing and lack of traffic control devices wont make many major roads impassable though.
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General Discussion / Re: Erick PLEASE
« Last post by Erick on December 15, 2017, 01:25:06 PM »
JoJo,

thanks for the kind words.
Also I edited my posts above a bit for clarity so feel free to reread.  :dance:
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General Off Topic / Re: Crypto coins
« Last post by Grudgie on December 15, 2017, 12:41:23 PM »
Problem is that when you turn off the electricity bitcoin becomes unusable.  Its a bit difficult to put a bitcoin in my jar under the second post from the left on the back fence.

Nemo

If electricity goes out your Bitcoin will be safe on the blockchain. In 10 years or less when the power grid is decentralized, this won't be a concern at all.
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General Off Topic / Re: Crypto coins
« Last post by Grudgie on December 15, 2017, 12:35:28 PM »
Let me put it this way.

Bitcoin is to Gold, as Email is to Letters

If I received an email from someone, I wouldn't say, "This email has no value to me because it isn't made of paper". That would be silly. The value of a paper letter is that it conveys meaning abstractly. An email acomplishes this as well.

It's the same with Bitcoin and gold.

If your ROI is ~3500% how do you cash out?

How did you buy in?

I bought in through a company called Coinbase. They take a flat 1% fee over spot. I haven't cashed out and I don't plan on it in the near future. If I do cash out it would be through Coinbase again. Or I would buy gold with BTC and sell the gold for dollars.
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General Off Topic / Re: Crypto coins
« Last post by grizz on December 15, 2017, 11:21:39 AM »
Let me put it this way.

Bitcoin is to Gold, as Email is to Letters

If I received an email from someone, I wouldn't say, "This email has no value to me because it isn't made of paper". That would be silly. The value of a paper letter is that it conveys meaning abstractly. An email acomplishes this as well.

It's the same with Bitcoin and gold.

If your ROI is ~3500% how do you cash out?

How did you buy in?
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General Discussion / Re: Erick PLEASE
« Last post by JoJo on December 15, 2017, 11:20:26 AM »
 WOW YOU DA MAN. You answered all of my questions and some I didn't think of. Using the map and 15kt bomb I couldn't be more safe than I am now what ever important target they hit.

 I hope you don't have the cold my wife and I have. We're in our fourth week and still sick.

Take care and thanks
Jojo
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