Author Topic: AAR: NCScout Recon & Surveillance Class  (Read 272 times)

Offline JohnyMac

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AAR: NCScout Recon & Surveillance Class
« on: February 26, 2019, 10:12:23 AM »
Below is my AAR for this past weekends Recon & Surveillance Class. Please use it in conjunction with my and others comments who attended the class located here.
 
What:
This AAR (After Action Review) is to briefly outline my attendance of the Recon & Surveillance two-day class facilitated by NCScout blog owner of Brushbeater.com.

Who:
Facilitator NCScout and six students. The student’s skill range was, former military to novice – Like me. NCScout also had two assistants or specialists that worked 1:1 with each student.

When:
Saturday – Sunday, February 23-24, 2019. Classes started at 0900 hrs. both days. The class ended Saturday at 1600 hrs. for dinner then picked up again for the night portion at 1900 hrs. till 2100 hrs. Sunday start was 0900 hrs. and concluded at 1430 hrs. post an AAR session.

Where:
North Central North Carolina

Comments:
The class rallied at 0800 hrs. Saturday morning after a hearty breakfast put on again by NCScout’s family. We convoyed over to the location where the class was going to be conducted and our home for the next two days.

Starting at 0910 hrs. Saturday, a quick review of the next two days agenda commenced.

> Pace count,
> Stealth movement,
> Review of patrolling hand signals,
> Review and practice of Squad travel while on patrol,
> Proper Break Contact drills,
> Actual patrol (s),
> Setting up a Hide and OP/LP,
> Night maneuvers,
> Review of camouflage at night,
> Enhancements to night patrols, e.g. NOD’s FLIR, etc.,
> Writing an Operations Order, and
> Running an Ops Order

Each block of the two-day agenda built on to the next block. The goal was to build a solid foundation for the group to execute on the final exercise or Ops Order Sunday morning.

During the two days NCScout had each three-man team hooked up with a specialist for more 1:1 instruction. At times the specialist’s doubled as the enemy and orchestrated ambushes on our patrols.   

The Good, The Bad, and The Ugly in no order:
 
> Let me get this out first – The weather sucked! The area received rain Friday through Sunday in the totals of; .44/1.88/.14 of an inch per day. Temps hovered in the low 40’s and at 0330 hrs. Sunday morning, we had snow flurries.
> Except for Friday night and Saturday morning, MRE’s was the primary food source for the team. Some students brought treats to share amongst the group, e.g. bear, venison, summer sausage, bacon, etc. Saturday night NCScout made a stew.
> As is NCScout’s MO, (modus operandi) the class blocks within the two days agenda were well thought out and progressively brought the student along the path to the end game – An actual operation.
> There were three structures at the class area to stay in. Two tobacco barns and one Amish shed. One barn and the shed were used for sleeping and keeping out of the elements. A fire was lighted Saturday afternoon and was kept fueled during our stay at the camp.
> All segments of the two-day agenda were done with the students geared-up, including primary and secondary weapons. 
> Although this 63-year-old did relatively well, I would encourage all participants in the future before you take this class, to concentrate on squats and upper torso exercises before you arrive. Squatting frequently while wearing 20 pounds of gear and lugging around an 8-pound rifle is tough on the healthiest of us. To not have been in shape would have surely sucked.
> A more detailed list on what we should bring for the patrolling part of the class was suggested for future classes. We all were prepared however, it resulted in many bringing too much to the camp. Some students had everything including the kitchen sink.     
> The members of the class blended well by Saturday morning. The ‘after dinner discussions’ certainly cemented the group. As I have reported in past AAR’s, what I learned from my fellow classmates was just as valuable as what we learned during the days instruction.
> All the students but one, had been to NCScout’s RTO 101 class. Several had been to RTO 101 & 201 class.
> As I have reported in previous AAR’s on NCScout’s classes, NCScout and the specialists who supported him, were soft spoken folks who were dedicated to the student getting as much from the class as was possible. If you like the ‘DI’ (Drill Instructor) type of facilitator, you will not like NCScout’s style.
> I think we can all agree that the coming years will be treacherous in this country and around the globe. If you have put away your family’s 3-B’s great! Now you need to get some training! To not do so means you and your family will not survive long enough to use those preps you have in your cellar.

God Bless & 73,
JohnyMac

« Last Edit: February 04, 2020, 09:33:23 AM by JohnyMac »
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Offline patriotman

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Re: AAR: NCScout Recon & Surveillance Class
« Reply #1 on: February 26, 2019, 10:33:53 AM »
Below is my AAR for this past weekends Recon & Surveillance Class. Please use it in conjunction with my and others who attended the class comments located here.
 
What:
This AAR (After Action Review) is to briefly outline my attendance of the Recon & Surveillance two-day class facilitated by NCScout blog owner of Brushbeater.com.

Who:
Facilitator NCScout and six students. The student’s skill range was, former military to novice – Like me. NCScout also had two assistants or specialists that worked 1:1 with each student.

When:
Saturday – Sunday, February 23-24, 2019. Classes started at 0900 hrs. both days. The class ended Saturday at 1600 hrs. for dinner then picked up again for the night portion at 1900 hrs. till 2100 hrs. Sunday start was 0900 hrs. and concluded at 1430 hrs. post an AAR session.

Where:
North Central North Carolina

Comments:
The class rallied at 0800 hrs. Saturday morning after a hearty breakfast put on again by NCScout’s family. We convoyed over to the location where the class was going to be conducted and our home for the next two days.

Starting at 0910 hrs. Saturday, a quick review of the next two days agenda commenced.

> Pace count,
> Stealth movement,
> Review of patrolling hand signals,
> Review and practice of Squad travel while on patrol,
> Proper Break Contact drills,
> Actual patrol (s),
> Setting up a Hide and OP/LP,
> Night maneuvers,
> Review of camouflage at night,
> Enhancements to night patrols, e.g. NOD’s FLIR, etc.,
> Writing an Operations Order, and
> Running an Ops Order

Each block of the two-day agenda built on to the next block. The goal was to build a solid foundation for the group to execute on the final exercise or Ops Order Sunday morning.

During the two days NCScout had each three-man team hooked up with a specialist for more 1:1 instruction. At times the specialist’s doubled as the enemy and orchestrated ambushes on our patrols.   

The Good, The Bad, and The Ugly in no order:
 
> Let me get this out first – The weather sucked! The area received rain Friday through Sunday in the totals of; .44/1.88/.14 of an inch per day. Temps hovered in the low 40’s and at 0330 hrs. Sunday morning, we had snow flurries.
> Except for Friday night and Saturday morning, MRE’s was the primary food source for the team. Some students brought treats to share amongst the group, e.g. bear, venison, summer sausage, bacon, etc. Saturday night NCScout made a stew.
> As is NCScout’s MO, (modus operandi) the class blocks within the two days agenda were well thought out and progressively brought the student along the path to the end game – An actual operation.
> There were three structures at the class area to stay in. Two tobacco barns and one Amish shed. One barn and the shed were used for sleeping and keeping out of the elements. A fire was lighted Saturday afternoon and was kept fueled during our stay at the camp.
> All segments of the two-day agenda were done with the students geared-up, including primary and secondary weapons. 
> Although this 63-year-old did relatively well, I would encourage all participants in the future before you take this class, to concentrate on squats and upper torso exercises before you arrive. Squatting frequently while wearing 20 pounds of gear and lugging around an 8-pound rifle is tough on the healthiest of us. To not have been in shape would have surely sucked.
> A more detailed list on what we should bring for the patrolling part of the class was suggested for future classes. We all were prepared however, it resulted in many bringing too much to the camp. Some students had everything including the kitchen sink.     
> The members of the class blended well by Saturday morning. The ‘after dinner discussions’ certainly cemented the group. As I have reported in past AAR’s, what I learned from my fellow classmates was just as valuable as what we learned during the days instruction.
> All the students but one, had been to NCScout’s RTO 101 class. Several had been to RTO 101 & 201 class.
> As I have reported in previous AAR’s on NCScout’s classes, NCScout and the specialists who supported him, were soft spoken folks who were dedicated to the student getting as much from the class as was possible. If you like the ‘DI’ (Drill Instructor) type of facilitator, you will not like NCScout’s style.
> I think we can all agree that the coming years will be treacherous in this country and around the globe. If you have put away your family’s 3-B’s great! Now you need to get some training! To not do so means you and your family will not survive long enough to use those preps you have in your cellar.

God Bless & 73,
JohnyMac


I really cannot add much to this. A comprehensive overview indeed. You quickly learn what pieces of your gear does and does not work, what your fellow classmate's kits look like and how you can adapt some elements to your own, and it is the type of learning environment in which a true novice in these sorts of endeavors (such as myself) can really focus on learning and not on getting my ass screamed at.
Blessed be the LORD my strength, which teacheth my hands to war, and my fingers to fight: My goodness, and my fortress; my high tower, and my deliverer; my shield, and he in whom I trust; who subdueth my people under me.

Psalm 144:1-2